Natasha’s Daily Scripture, Prayer, and Reflection for 5.2.16

Scripture 
““He is not here, but He has been resurrected! Remember how He spoke to you when He was still in Galilee, saying, ‘The Son of Man must be betrayed into the hands of sinful men, be crucified, and rise on the third day’? ””

‭‭Luke‬ ‭24:6-7‬ ‭HCSB‬‬

Pray

Add a layer to me Lord, so that with You as my armor and shield I can continue to endure all that comes my way, in service of You. The past I cannot change, the future only You know, and my present lies with You. In Jesus’ name I pray for strength, courage, perseverance, patience, and understanding. Amen. 

Reflection 

Jesus knew how his days were numbered, knowing what must take place in order for his life to be aligned with the prophecies told long before his human birth. He knew that he would not see life beyond his thirties. We don’t have that clear insight. We know that we’re not going to life in these human bodies forever, but we don’t know exactly how we’re going to depart; we don’t know what events will take place to lead to the day of our transition. Even a person fighting cancer, HIV, dementia, lupus, MS, or some other disease or disorder, doesn’t know exactly what will lead to them taking their last breath. Rather than it being their disease, what if it’s another series of events… 

Some people may believe and know that they won’t live long lives, such as my father, who told me in his late 30s and 40s that, “I won’t live to be an old man,” and true to his word he passed at the age of 48 from a heart attack. But he didn’t know the exact circumstances and details, and I know for a fact he wasn’t expecting to go that day, week, month, or even that year. My dad had huge plans for himself and our family.  

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. began to see that his journey would most likely lead to an early death at the hands of someone else. His conversations and speeches in his last year and months, reflect that he had insight or a gut feeling that he wouldn’t live to be an elderly man. He was correct. His human life was cut short at the age of 39. But I don’t think he knew the series of events that would lead to his assassination on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel. He too had big plans lined up for the week, month, and year. 

People who have been diagnosed with life-threatening and terminal diseases and conditions know that the odds are stacked against them, but even they don’t know exactly when and how they will transition. Rather than it be the disease, what if it turned out to be human error or an accident of sorts that leads to that person’s demise?

Whom amongst us knows exactly how they are to spend their final days? I’ve yet to meet a person where there’s been prophecy or a direct statement from God declaring the journey and end of someone’s path here on Earth. Where that person walked each day knowing that certain things would have to take place in order to trigger other events, that would eventually lead to their demise. 

Since we are not sure of when and how we will leave this level of existence, shouldn’t we live each day to the fullest? 

Jesus knew the prophecy of his life, that he would be betrayed and how he would physically die, yet he didn’t stray from God’s plans—he didn’t slack off from his responsibilities, or sink into a deep depression and hide. Instead, he lived each and everyday to the fullest, giving of himself to others, fully sharing in life and in love. 

If you want to be more like Jesus, shouldn’t you model his thinking and approach towards life? Shouldn’t you live each day fully present, alert, and grateful? Shouldn’t you love deeply and honorably? Shouldn’t you give to the least of God’s children without question and judgment? Shouldn’t you jump out of bed excited and joyful because you have one more day of life, and a chance to do good for yourself and others? Shouldn’t you take the opportunity to right any wrongs caused by you or others?

Consider it…

Questions of the Day

1. What would you like to add to today’s prayer and/or reflection?

2. What are your thoughts about today’s message?

Feel free to share your answers, prayers, comments, and reflections in the comment section below. You can also send me an email at: breakingbreadwithnatasha@gmail.com 

Please also feel free to share this post with others. We’re never quite sure who needs to hear and see what, and when! It would be awesome if whenever you run across a prayer, message, or scripture that moves you, you would kindly share it with the rest of us. You can post it on this blog or send me an email. 

Love always,

Natasha

Copyright 2013-2016. Natasha Foreman Bryant. Some Rights Reserved. All Prayers and Reflections are Copyright Protected by Natasha Foreman Bryant, unless otherwise noted. Prior posts from 2009-2013 are copyrighted under the name Natasha L. Foreman. breakingbreadwithnatasha.com

Scripture quotations taken from the Amplified® Bible, Copyright © 1954, 1958, 1962, 1964, 1965, 1987 by The Lockman Foundation Used by permission.(www.Lockman.org)

Scripture taken from the Common English Bible®, CEB® Copyright © 2010, 2011 by Common English Bible.™ Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide. The “CEB” and “Common English Bible” trademarks are registered in the United States Patent and Trademark Office by Common. English Bible. Use of either trademark requires the permission of Common English Bible.

Scripture quotations marked HCSB are taken from the Holman Christian Standard Bible®, Copyright © 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003 by Holman Bible Publishers. Used by permission. Holman Christian Standard Bible®, Holman CSB®, and HCSB® are federally registered trademarks of Holman Bible Publishers.

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